Dave Marsee — User Experience and Game Designer based in Seattle

Game Design

Video Game for Mobile, Tablet, Xbox, and PC

itunes.apple.com/us/app/magic-duels/id881106329?mt=8

Magic Duels is a game intended for the broadest possible audience. Not only people who already play the Magic paper game, but also curious passers-by. My responsibilities, in addition to creating the site maps, journey flows, and wireframes, was to create the New Player Experience, including tutorials.

ForWizards of the Coast RoleSenior UX Designer and Game Designer
Date2009-2015, 2016-2017

I re-organized elements on the battlefield to increase understanding for new players: Arrow directionality, alignment of creatures in combat, labels of turn and phase, iconography, etc.

Part of my responsibilities were to create wireframes for scenes across the application, including the Duel Scene. This Wireframe was to address the problem of some elements occulding the player’s view, and where they should go instead.

Magic Duels was built to appeal to three groups of players. I wrote personas for each, based on business objectives, and player research.

This is an early draft of the game flow for the MVP (Minimum Viable Product). This does not include many features slated to be added later (including: Collection, deck building, store, options, etc.)

This represents the flow for the store in Duels, showing how the player will navigate through as new products are added.

This redesign of the deck selection screen was in response to usability studies. Understanding players' needs is paramount in my work. Their ability to understand and use the app takes a higher priority than any other concern.

I designed Duels’s major new feature: the step-by-step tutorial system. By making each principle bite-sized, with illustrations, teaching effectiveness has dramatically improved.

We found newer players were daunted by the “blank page” of the custom deck builder, so I designed a new feature: a “wizard” that holds the player’s hand, giving suggestions as they make new decks.

Many games proliferate names and avatars (username, avatar, character name, etc). To simplify, I integrated the player’s deck box into their avatar. This two-step process helps the player to have something unique when playing against opponents.

As part of Magic R&D’s research arm, I’ve authored multiple 100+ page books understanding the best practices (UX and otherwise) in the Digital Game space.

The idea of vertically aligning attackers and blockers began with my work on Magic Online. Previously, combat was a mishmash of arrows, criss-crossing the battlefield.

Wireframe 1 of 30 of Magic Online’s extremely complex collection scene.